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Mobility and Flexibility Expand Working Mothers’ Success

In the U.S., women have historically had less access to cars, but their traditional, gendered family roles have increased their share of household-related trips—think daycare pickup, grocery shopping, and the like. The mismatch between women’s mobility constraints and burdens has, in turn, created significant restrictions in women’s labor market choices. As a result, employed women’s work commute trips were, for decades, shorter in both distance and time than those of employed men.

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Settler Colonialism: American Indians and US Racial Self-Conceptions

In Part 2 of a recent interview (find Part 1 here), Gender Policy Report curator, Professor William P. Jones, spoke to Sociologist Evelyn Nakano Glenn, a Professor of the Graduate School and founding Director of the Center for Race & Gender at the University of California, Berkeley, about settler colonialism. Settler colonialism is a concept […]

The US Withdrawal from UNESCO: Undermining Girls’ Education

The Trump administration has made yet another devastating decision undermining girls’ and women’s education, and this time its effects will be felt throughout the world. Last week, the White House revealed that the U.S. would withdraw its support from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), an institution established in 1945 with the inauguration of the United Nations itself. It is sadly ironic that the UNESCO announcement was made the day after the United Nations’ International Day of the Girl Child, an annual event on October 11th that draws attention to the challenges facing girls around the world and to advances in the achievement of their human rights. Claiming the decision is due to UNESCO’s “anti-Israel bias,” it also provides further evidence of an administration opposed to multilateralism and ignorant of the vital role of UNESCO in promoting gender justice in education.

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The Feminization of Carework

Women in the United States have long been expected to care for others out of love or devotion rather than for money. This feminization of care work has resulted in low wages for domestic workers, who are often immigrant women, and the exclusion, historically and today, of care workers in many parts of the workforce from the protections of labor laws and policies. In Part 1 of a recent interview, Gender Policy Report curator, Professor William P. Jones spoke to Sociologist Evelyn Nakano Glenn about this topic and its intersection with U.S. labor and immigration policy.

Declining Diversity in the Federal Government Under President Trump

By Diana Boesch October 2, 2017 President Trump’s nominees show a stark trend toward less diverse candidates by race and gender. White men consist of 74% of President Trump’s cabinet and cabinet-level positions, 72% of lower federal court nominees, and 90% of U.S. Attorney appointees. In addition, 79% of President Trump’s Executive Branch nominees are […]