Stakeholders with authentic disagreements about and experiences in transactional sex can work together to reduce common harms in the sex trades through participatory policymaking that includes a wide range of people with lived experience, including people who identify as survivors of trafficking, sexual exploitation, and sex work.

Registries to track child maltreatment allegations are one of many state tools for surveilling low-income Black mothers, and they can lead to devastating consequences for family and youth.

Rather than continuing to put money, time, and effort into the criminal legal system which has failed to deter intimate partner violence, IPV policy should center economic, community, and public health solutions. Such solutions shift the focus of IPV policy from reaction to prevention and provide justice for people unwilling or unable to turn safely to state-based criminal punishment systems.

Most young people become ‘sex trafficking victims’ due to poverty, racism, transphobia, and homophobia. Arresting ‘pimps’, and young people, won’t solve these problems.

The perfect mother is a ubiquitous, if impossible, part of American life. We see her in spandex at the gym, working out—self-care!—a week after delivering twins. She’s at center-stage when internet experts opine about how mothers can prevent teenagers’ opioid addictions. In the shadow of this unattainable, idealized vision of a mother as a virtual guarantor of their children’s health and happiness, actual mothers berate themselves for falling short of perfection, feeling ashamed and inadequate. In the American legal system, the pervasive stereotype of the perfect mother can lead to serious consequences, dramatically distorting the judgments of police, prosecutors, judges, and jurors.